Category Archives: MyStyle Renderer

Renderer 3.20.1 Update: Edit and Switch Out Text and Emojis Directly within the Renderer

MyStyle Renderer Empowering Change

MyStyle Platform’s new Renderer feature empowers clients to edit and fix their own print files.  In just a few simple clicks, you can now edit and change text, emojis, etc. Gone are the days of escalating renders just to switch out and edit text within your design!  MyStyle Platform is happy to announce our newly released feature that lets you edit a design’s text directly within the renderer.  Simply click, edit as desired, and save your print file!

How to Edit Text and  Emoji’s the Renderer

  1. Open the renderer and scroll down to the section “PRINT IMAGE(S)”
  2. Right click on the text/emoji/”object” you wish to edit.
  3. From the pulldown options, select “edit object”
4.  The “Text Lines” edit box will open.  The text you selected and wish to edit will be in the text slot “Text line#1”   5.  Highlight the text within the “Text line#1” & edit as desired 6. Edit text and click “Apply” to apply changes.  

How to Download JPG Print File from Renderer

  1.  Click “JPG” button to download JPG  print file
 

Renderer 3.19.0 Update: New JPG DPI Support Means Photoshop and Other Software Now Will Open MyStyle Print Images at 300dpi or Any Preferred DPI

This is a very old, very small, very annoying issue with resolution of JPEG and PNG files that every designer and printer is familiar with, and we’ve finally beat it.  Especially when it comes to JPG, if it wasn’t made with Photoshop, even though it was the right pixel size, it just wouldn’t open up at the DPI that it was created for (ie 300), and Photoshop defaults to whatever it wants (usually 72 or 96).  Well, we’re happy to say in 3.19.0+ we broke through and were able to add a new feature under the hood that automatically fixes this and makes rewrites the file data so that it will open up at the intended DPI in almost any software – Photoshop, Print Software – etc. Ring the bells. We did it.

The Decades-Old JPG DPI Issue

You may know the situation well:  the image is the right size in pixels, but it’s reading at the wrong DPI and so the “inches” measurement of the image is not correct.  That is, until someone opens it up, and changes the DPI in Photoshop or print software manually to 300 or whatever it needs to be – most systems default DPI is typically 72 or 96 dpi, sometimes 100. But, most images are rendered for print at 300dpi (Pro Magazine-level print standard), so opening at 72 etc is annoying and can cause wasted time in the production workflow.

One Does Not Simply, Set the JPG DPI

The reason that 300dpi doesn’t open up in Photoshop or print software, though, is because the JPG file format doesn’t natively support resolution settings, so there’s traditionally almost no online resources for setting unsupported meta data.  In HTML5 it doesn’t have any parameters to specify resolution, it’s purely pixel data.  In the eyes of the raw JPG format, resolution is irrelevant, there is image data at a size of pixels, and the resolution can be whatever the screen (or software) wants it to be, which is subjective and relative to the system / software, so it doesn’t specify it natively.   Additionally, the file code is not easily read or edited, so it’s not something that anything besides graphic design software can or would try to set. The problem is that Photoshop etc doesn’t have a setting to allow you to set the default image resolution, it detects it from your system (ie “72”) and just goes with that.  That by itself, is also very annoying (re: Photoshop fix this please).

Many people point out that resolution is arbitrary and subjective, because the pixel size of the image is the actual size of the data, but nevertheless others will argue that in practice the default DPI within Workflows can be important to eliminate room for error or misunderstandings about the intended print size. So in fact, it can be critical for smooth operations from web to print regardless of the file format’s native data spec.  So, we’ve searched and searched, literally for years, and thanks to some new advances in Javascript in the past year, we’ve found a way to do it without Photoshop, and it was not simple, but low and behold – IT WORKS.

Interestingly enough, as we dissect the byte code for a JPEG we see that there are meta data points for resolution that do allow us to inject settings here that Photoshop will read, and they’re actually in Dots Per Meter, as if ANYONE would even use that when DPI is the standard!  Imagine how old that must be.  We digress.

The New Age Fix.  Good News: We’ve Made It Automatic.

We’ve developed a way to set this DPI setting within JPG output in our MyStyle Renderer software.  With 3.19.0+ every JPG  comes with resolution meta data.

Whatever it says on page is the DPI, will be the DPI when re-opened in other software:

Drumroll… JPG Opens with Correct DPI!

JPG output files will open up at whatever DPI it says in the Renderer when viewed in Photoshop or Print Software, including both if that was the template’s original setting, and if you change the resolution manually after rendering it and then download the JPG.

150 dpi?  Sure.  300? Of course.  632 dpi?  Why not!

Bad News: There Is None.

This should alleviate one of the most annoying parts of printing with JPGs, and we’re so happy to advanced this aspect of the workflow for everyone who’s taking designs from web to print like our team does every day.

Goodbye, Extra Manual or Batch Processes!

Please note that if you have batch processes already made that set the DPI for your print files as a workaround for this, you can (or may need to) adjust or get rid of that now to streamline things a bit more knowing that the DPI is already set correctly.

Less is more.

 

Print Image Renderer Now Offers Eye-Saving Dark Theme

If you utilize the MyStyle Print File Renderer with your production process, then at least one person on that team will appreciate this! We’ve released a new Dark Theme that can be chosen from the new minimized menu (three dots …). Once you choose this theme, it will fade the screen to dark greys instead of light greys.

Choose the Dark Theme from the menu and it will save your preference in your browser. Any time you use that browser it will automatically reload the theme. Click the same option again to turn it off and go back to the standard light theme.  Now that I’ve been using it for about a month in beta I can’t even go back to the light theme at all!  It’s soothing to use the theme.

I can also see why Adobe adopted a similar look in Photoshop as the dark neutral look allows for the print images themselves to really breathe and pop even in the darker ranges.

So, this can be a great eye saver (and battery saver) especially at night when darker UIs help reduce eye strain.  And, it looks pretty cool, too. Have a look:

dark theme print file renderer 2

If you  or your staff use the Print Renderer then enjoy the Dark Theme, your eyes will thank you!

If you don’t see it yet, clear your cache and refresh :)